Daikon Radish

$3.00

Daikon radish is a popular Asian vegetable that looks similar to a carrot except typically white in color and larger in size. Subtly sweet and slightly spicy, it’s delightfully crunchy raw and soft and tender when cooked. Daikon radishes can be added to salads, soups, relishes, or ferments and are also commonly used in stir-fries and kimchi. You can also slice Daikon and use it to top sandwiches or toast.

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Description

Daikon radish is a popular Asian vegetable and one of the most common vegetables in Japan. It is a root that looks similar to a carrot except it is typically white in color and larger in size. Daikon radishes are subtly sweet and slightly spicy, a combination I adore! When eaten raw, it’s delightfully crunchy. When cooked, it becomes soft and tender and it’s mild flavor mellows even more when cooked. Daikon radishes can be added to salads, soups, relishes, or ferments and are also commonly used in stir-fries and kimchi. You can also slice Daikon and use it to top sandwiches or toast.

How to Store Daikon Radishes

  • Wash well before using.
  • Wrap it in a damp kitchen towel and store it for up to two weeks in the fridge.

Cooking Ideas for Daikon Radishes

  • Slivered and fried: My favorite way to eat daikon radishes is to slice them extremely thin and length-wise with a mandoline and then fry them in a little sesame oil, soy sauce, and a drop or two of liquid smoke. They carry the flavor nicely and make a great topper for salad, or vegan bacon in a BLT, if you cook them long enough to get crispy.
  • Raw: Slice daikon radishes just like you would a carrot and include them in salads, sandwiches, tacos, burritos, spring rolls, or toast. Round slices add a lovely crunch to avocado toast. I have even been known to eat them raw like a carrot, but I am weird and like strong flavors. 😂
  • In Soups: Daikon radish is perfect for adding flavor and texture to soup. Shred it or dice it and add it near the end of cooking. This allows the radish to retain its crunch and get too mushy.
  • Pickled or Fermented: Daikon radish makes a great candidate for a pickle or a ferment. They are commonly used in kimchi. I sometimes make them into a quick pickle to add a little color and freshness to taco night!
  • Crispy chips: TBD
  • Substitute for carrots: TBD
  • Freezing: TBD

Recipes for Daikon Radishes

Additional information

Color

Blue

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